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Looking for something to do this week? Here are 30 things!

April 8th, 2013 · 1 Comment

30 Things To Do In New Orleans While In Town For French Quarter Festival
by STAFF on MARCH 26, 2013
in ARTS & CULTURE, COCKTAIL CULTURE, EVENTS, FAMILY FRIENDLY, FOOD, MUSIC, SHOPPING, TRAVEL
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It’s that time again – the time to consume as much New Orleans food, music and culture that’s humanly possible, all within the national historic landmark known as the French Quarter. One of the world’s most iconic neighborhoods will be filled with friends and strangers from near and far to absorb New Orleans concentrated into four days of more fun than anyone should ever be allowed to have – and yet, they will. Because we pile it on in New Orleans. Get ready to be one of those lucky attendees at the 2013 French Quarter Festival on April 11-14.

To celebrate the French Quarter Festival’s 30th anniversary, we give you 30 things you should find and do while you’re here, other than eat the food and see the music at the fest, of course. Behold, our top 30 activities in New Orleans right now, some old and some new, in no particular order.

The Panorama Jazz Band playing at the Spotted Cat (Photo by Sally Tunmer)
1. Live music on Frenchmen Street – There are more musical legends playing in one night on a few blocks of Frenchmen Street than there are in one year in some towns. Stop by the Spotted Cat, the Apple Barrel, d.b.a., the Blue Nile and Maison for some of the best jazz, blues, rock and hip hop you can find in New Orleans, or anywhere for that matter.

2. Visit Congo Square in Armstrong Park – I don’t know that much more explanation is needed for going to Congo Square other than to witness the birthplace of American music, but if you still need convincing, it’s located in the beautifully revitalized Armstrong Park with gorgeous landscaping and weekly Sunday drum circles.

3. Take a tour – With the endless options of wonderful things to see and do in New Orleans, making a game plan can be a little daunting. New Orleans tours make it easy on you, allowing you to see different parts of the city you may not have known from the eyes of a local. Our personal favorites? There is a plethora of different types of tours to choose from, but we are partial to the Cocktail Tour and the Confederacy of Cruisers.

Lining up for the Empanada Infitada food truck! (Photo by Sally Tunmer)
4. Grab a “meal-on-wheels” from a food truck – NOLA is known for its amazing cuisine, and sometimes, when you’re lucky, that cuisine comes right to you – or, at least to a bar, which in a lot of ways is kind of the same. There have been a whole slew of New Orleans food trucks popping up around the city, and the best way to find them is by their twitter handles or on Facebook. My personal favorites are the Seoul Man tacos from Taceaux Loceaux (@TLNola), “The Gary” (goat cheese, grape jelly and bacon on a croissant) from Frencheeze (@frencheezetruck), the SaSquash from Empanada Infitada (@EmpanadaIntifad) and the falafel sandwich from The Fat Falafel (@FatFalafel).

5. Explore one of our unique cemeteries – If you’ve ever questioned the uniqueness of NOLA, you’ve probably never been on a cemetery tour. Our cemeteries are unique for a number of a reasons, the first is that most of our dead are buried above ground and the second is that our cemeteries are also extremely popular tourist destinations and many are heavily trafficked every day. You can take a guided cemetery tour or pop in yourself and stroll around. My favorites are Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 and St. Louis Cemetery No. 1 and No. 3.

6. See a brass band – Whenever I suggest “seeing a brass band” to out-of-town guests, I get a skeptical look or two. That’s because they’ve never heard Rebirth. Or the Soul Rebels. Or Kermit Ruffins. One evening at Maple Leaf will be enough to not only change their minds, but have them scouting for more.

7. Have breakfast – One of the best breakfasts around is beignets and café au lait, but New Orleans breakfast has so much more to offer. Once you’ve hit up Café Du Monde, get out and explore the neighborhoods of New Orleans AND start your day with a great breakfast! There are tons of great choices, from Elizabeth’s and Satsuma in Bywater, Surrey’s in the Lower Garden District, Camellia Grill and Refuel in the Riverbend (on the St. Charles streetcar line) and many, many more!

The St. Charles streetcar (Photo by Susan Whelan)
8. Take the streetcar – In New Orleans, life goes at a slightly slower pace. Nowhere is this more evident than on the streetcar. Step back in time and take a ride across town! Choose either green (St. Charles Avenue), which will take you Uptown through the beautiful Garden District, or red (Canal Street) which will lead you to some of our unique cemeteries or City Park. Sit back and enjoy the ride!

9. See a comedy show at The New Movement – Over the past year since The New Movement opened in the Marigny, the comedy scene in New Orleans has exploded. The little comedy theater with big talent hosts improv, sketch and standup shows every Thursday – Sunday. A night at The New Movement makes for a refreshingly different New Orleans outing.

10. Go dancing – You know what goes great with New Orleans music? Dancing to it. We enjoy a lot of both here, whether it’s swing dancing which you can do at the French Quarter Festival both with the NOLA Jitterbugs and NOLA Zydeco, or shaking your groove thang with DJ Soul Sister at Mimi’s on Saturday nights, or just dancing in the street when the mood strikes.

A New Orleans Ramos Gin Fizz – delicious! (Photo by Susan Whelan)
11. Have a classic cocktail – New Orleans isn’t just hand grenades and daiquiris! New Orleans is the birthplace of several cocktails, including the Sazerac, known to be America’s oldest cocktail, and the Ramos gin fizz. The best place to experience these cocktails is in a classic cocktail bar such as Sazerac Bar, Carousel Bar, or French 75. Cheers!

12. Eat your way down Freret Street – The options for dining on Freret Street are so limitless, that sometimes I think the best of approach is to just do a “meal crawl” – drinks here, appetizers there, dinner part one at this place, dinner part two at that place… you get the picture. Company Burger has one of the best burgers in New Orleans, while al fresco hot dogs and loaded cheese fries are the specialty at Dat Dog. Amazing Neapolitan-style pizza is not to be missed at Ancora and Wayfare is my new fave for some seriously delicious sandwiches. With sushi, fried catfish, Mexican, Philly Cheesesteaks and craft cocktails all also available along the way, you’ll want to be sure to come with an appetite – and maybe someone who is better at decision making than I am.

13. Take the (free!) Algiers Ferry – If you have some time to kill, hop on the Algiers Ferry. It’s free and will provide you with one of the best views of New Orleans. It’s especially romantic during sunset. Once you’re in Algiers, head over to Old Point Bar and grab a drink or the Crown & Anchor (great beer list!) which is also pet friendly.

14. Shop on Magazine Street – Welcome to your six-mile long shopper’s paradise! Magazine Street is home to both local boutiques, like Aiden Gill and Blue Frog Chocolates, and popular brands, like Buffalo Exchange and Nadeau Furniture. My recommendation: Check out the Funky Monkey resale shop in the Irish Channel, then sip a draft beer on the Bulldog patio.

15. Have a Pimm’s Cup at Napoleon House – This is definitely something to check off the New Orleans to-do list. The historic Napoleon House in the French Quarter, originally contracted for Napoleon himself, serves one delicious Pimm’s Cup in a beautiful New Orleans atmosphere. Enjoy yours either in the tropical back courtyard or the rustic bar room.

A delicious New Orleans fried shrimp po-boy (Photo by Susan Whelan)
16. Eat a po-boy – Many cities have their own signature sandwich – hoagie, grinder, cheesesteak – New Orleans’ version is the po-boy. You will want to try as many versions of this as possible: fried shrimp, fried oyster, roast beef, debris, fried green tomato with shrimp remoulade – the choices are endless! New Orleanians will argue about which kind of po-boy is best and where to get it. Venture out to one of New Orleans’ iconic po-boy shops such as Parkway or Domilise’s and you won’t be disappointed.

17. Get a walking drink down Bourbon Street – It’s one of the most ubiquitous suggestions for what to do when visiting New Orleans, and with good reason. It doesn’t matter if it’s a real local’s experience you’re seeking or it’s the top tourist attractions you’re after, it’s worth it to grab a go cup and walk down Bourbon Street to see the spectacle of unbridled excess.

18. Go to a market – The French Market is a great place to spend an afternoon walking outside and browsing the various vendors’ goods. If you’re more of a night owl, check out the Frenchmen Street Art Market for entirely locally made gifts and goods.

19. Sip wine at Bacchanal – Tucked away on Poland Avenue in the Bywater, Bacchanal is the ultimate local’s secret. There is live music every night, and the kitchen serves both meat and vegetarian options until 11 p.m. Sipping wine in the Bacchanal courtyard is the best way to soak up New Orleans’ renaissance.

20. Eat oysters – There is an oyster bar in the French Quarter with a sign that reads Eat Oysters, Love Longer. Regardless of whether or not that’s true, oysters are one of my favorite treats and a beloved food in New Orleans. April is the perfect time for oysters, especially raw. You can get oysters just about anywhere but my personal favorites include: Casamentos, Felix’s, Pascal’s Manale, and Cooter Brown’s. (Local tip: every Friday at Le Bon Temps you can belly up to the bar and enjoy free oysters!)

One of the beautiful pieces in the Besthoff Sculpture Garden at NOMA (Photo by Sally Tunmer)
21. Sculpture Garden – A must-see, the free Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden offers the chance to take in some fresh air and marvel at the impressive collection of sculptures outside of the New Orleans Museum of Art. Walk over to the cafe and get ice cream cones to enjoy as you stroll.

22. Eat a snoball – Snoballs are back in season, so take full advantage and see for yourself what the fuss is all about! Local favorites include: Plum Street, Hansen’s, and Pandora. Try mixing and matching flavors ranging from satsuma to nectar cream!

23. Grab dinner and drinks down in the Bywater – Located just downriver from the Faubourg Marigny and French Quarter, the Bywater’s restaurant scene is absolutely on fire right now. Personally, I like to start with a drink (the Bywater Bomber is my top pick) and maybe a snack or two at Booty’s Street Food before settling into a meal and some additional craft cocktails over at Maurepas. You really can’t go wrong with any of the spots down there – BBQ from The Joint is out of this world good, and the pies at Pizza Delicious have an almost cult-like following and definitely pass muster with this former New Yorker.

24. Go record shopping – In a town full of music, we have a lot of excellent record stores in New Orleans with a vast local and regional selection, including perhaps the most well known – Louisiana Music Factory which has the biggest selection of Louisiana music of any record store in the world. Our other favorites are Domino Sound, Euclid Records, Skully’z and the Mushroom. Nothing beats browsing for great music, while listening to great music and talking about great music.

25. Explore Oak Street – Yes, you’re here for French Quarter Fest but there is more to NOLA than the French Quarter. One of the latest hot spots in New Orleans is Oak Street – a hip, funky and fun place to be. Highlights include Oak Wine Bar for cocktails and small plates, Blue Cypress Book Store for book browsing (one of my favorites!), Glue thrift shop, Z’otz coffee shop, Maple Leaf Bar (great live music!) and Jacques-Imo’s (fried roast beef po-boy? Yes, please!)

26. Visit one of our many museums – The Warehouse District in New Orleans is full of museums and galleries – from the National World War II Museum to the Contemporary Arts Center to the Museum of the American Cocktail. If you’re in town on a Thursday, make sure to check out “After Hours” at the Ogden Museum of Southern Art for an evening of drinks, art, and local music. The Louisiana State Museum has a wonderful network of exhibits in the French Quarter as well.

27. Eat beignets and drink cafe au lait at Cafe Du Monde – The perfect way to start or end your day, outdoor people watching at Cafe du Monde is easily followed by a walk around Jackson Square. During certain times of the day, groups of street performers will be entertaining nearby. (Note: don’t wear black if you’ll be eating beignets; you’ll thank us later!)

The St. Louis Cathedral in Jackson Square (Photo by visitnola on Flickr)
28. Take in the bayou on the Cabrini Bridge – A great spot for picnicking, the bayou is an open, calming space. Watch kayakers float by on the water and enjoy experiencing a quieter side of the city.

29. Go to an art gallery – New Orleans is not only home to an outpouring of incredible food and music, but art as well. There are two main art districts worth making a visit to – Julia Street and St. Claude Avenue for contemporary art.

30. Tour the St. Louis Cathedral – While you’re in Jackson Square for French Quarter Festival, take a look inside the gorgeous St. Louis Cathedral, one of the most well known and iconic historical landmarks in New Orleans.

Written by Sally Tunmer, Hartley Casbon, Andy Kutcher, Ann Marshall Thomas, Susan Whelan and Nikki Carter.

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Tennessee Williams Festival is this weekend! Here’s the schedule of happenings around town!

March 21st, 2013 · No Comments

Schedule
Plan out your entire Festival weekend!

See something you like? Make note of the ticket code (listed beneath the price for each event). You’ll need the ticket code for the events you want to attend when purchasing tickets from our online ticketing agent, Vendini.

Tickets for Mold are only available via www.SouthernRep.com or (504) 522-6545. You will not be able to buy tickets for this show on our site’s order form.

Please note that end times are approximate. Festival program and schedule are subject to change. Please check our Festival Updates to get the latest news.

We look forward to having you celebrate the Festival with us in the French Quarter. Stay tuned for upcoming highlights and author/artist interviews!

Don’t forget to purchase raffle tickets for a chance to win our 2013 Festival library, a collection of dozens of new releases and classics by speakers appearing at the Festival. The grand prize is worth over $2,000, and is great way to take the Festival home with you.

Wednesday, March 20th
TOP | WED | THU | FRI | SAT | SUN
Wednesday
6:30 PM–8:30 PM
▸ A Tennessee Williams Songbook: Only a Paper Moon

Location: The Old U.S. Mint
Included in: Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $100
Ticket Code(s): SongbooWed630pm

Thursday, March 21st
TOP | WED | THU | FRI | SAT | SUN
Thursday
9:00 AM–10:15 AM
▸ Write Your Own Success Story: Cornell Landry: The Art of Self-Publishing

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-LandryTh9am, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Thursday
11 AM–12:15 PM
▸ A Sense of Time and Place in Literary Fiction: Zachary Lazar: Mapping and Timing Narrative Space

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-LazarTh11am, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Thursday
1:30 PM–2:45 PM
▸ Resurrect the Past: Susan Straight: Mining History for Your Book

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-StraiTh130pm, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Thursday
3 PM–4:15 PM
▸ A Whole New World: Moira Crone: Shaping Speculative Fiction

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-CroneTh3pm, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Thursday
6:30 PM–8:00 PM
▸ Those Rare Electrical Things Between People: Readings of Three One-Act Plays by Tennessee Williams

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $35 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): RareElecTh630pm, AllAccessPass

Thursday
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
▸ “Mold” by John Biguenet

Location: Southern Repertory Theatre at the Contemporary Art Center, 900 Camp Street
Included in: All-Access Pass
Price: $20-35 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): N/A

Thursday
10 PM–11:15 PM
▸ A Tennessee Williams Songbook: Only a Paper Moon

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $38 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): SONGBOOKTH10PM

Friday, March 22nd
TOP | WED | THU | FRI | SAT | SUN
Friday
9 AM–10:15 AM
▸ How to Get Successfully Published: Arielle Eckstut & David Henry Sterry AKA The Book Doctors

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-EckstuFri9am, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Friday
9:15 AM–9:30 AM
▸ Tennessee Williams Scholars Conference: Introduction and Announcements

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Scholars Conference Pass
Price: $20 (Scholars Conference Pass) or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): ScholarsConf, AllAccessPass

Friday
9:30 AM–11:00 AM
▸ Tennessee Williams Scholars Conference: Presentation of Abstracts with Audience Discussion

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Scholars Conference Pass
Price: $20 (Scholars Conference Pass) or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): ScholarsConf, AllAccessPass

Friday
10 AM–12:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Literary Walking Tour

Location: Tour meets in the Hotel Monteleone Lobby, Heritage Tours
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Walking Tour
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): WalkTourFri10am, AllAccessPass

Friday
10 AM–11:15 AM
▸ Imitating Life: The Family in Fiction

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassFri

Friday
11 AM–12:15 PM
▸ Your Manuscript’s Greatest Champion: Danielle Evans & Ayesha Pande: The Author-Agent Connection

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-EvansFr11am, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Friday
11:15 AM–12:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Scholars Conference: “Tom and Tennessee in Europe, 1928 & 1948”

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Scholars Conference Pass
Price: $20 (Scholars Conference Pass) or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): ScholarsConf, AllAccessPass

Friday
11:30 AM–12:45 PM
▸ New Orleans in 1920s: Bohemians, Baby Dolls, and Storyville

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassFri

Friday
1 PM–2:15 PM
▸ The Art of the Debut: Writers on their First Books

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassFri

Friday
1:30 PM–2:45 PM
▸ Scenes from a Screenwriter’s Notebook: John Patrick Shanley: Big Screen Stories

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-ShanFri130pm, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Friday
1:30 PM–2:45 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Scholars Conference: “Tennessee Williams and the Cold War”

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Scholars Conference Pass
Price: $20 (Scholars Conference Pass) or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): ScholarsConf, AllAccessPass

Friday
2 PM–4:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Literary Walking Tour

Location: Tour meets in the Hotel Monteleone Lobby, Heritage Tours
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Walking Tour
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): WalkTourFri2pm, AllAccessPass

Friday
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
▸ Creole Women

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassFri

Friday
2:30 PM–3:30 PM
▸ “Auto-Da-Fe” by Tennessee Williams

Location: Hermann-Grima House, 820 St. Louis Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): AutoDaFeFr230pm, AllAccessPass

Friday
3 PM–4:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Scholars Conference: “Scenes from an Early ‘Battle’”

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Scholars Conference Pass
Price: $20 (Scholars Conference Pass) or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): Tennessee Williams Scholars Conference: “Scenes from an Early ‘Battle’”

Friday
3 PM–4:15 PM
▸ The Playwright’s Craft: Marsha Norman: Writing for the Stage

Location: The Historic New Orleans Collection
Included in: All-Access Pass, Master Class Full Series Pass, Individual Master Class Ticket
Price: $25 or included in Master Class series registration or All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): MC-NormanFri3pm, AllAccessPass, MastClassSeries

Friday
4:00 PM–5:15 PM
▸ Free People of Color

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassFri

Friday
5:30 PM–7:00 PM
▸ Restaurant Scoop from the Virtual Gourmet: John Mariani

Location: Windsor Court Hotel, 300 Gravier Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $40 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): RestaurFri530pm, AllAccessPass

Friday
7 PM–8:30 PM
▸ The Gnädiges Fräulein

Location: Dutch Alley Performance Pavilion on St. Phillip & Decatur, near the French Market.
Included in: All-Access Pass, Theater Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): GnadigesFri7pm, AllAccessPass

Friday
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
▸ “Mold” by John Biguenet

Location: Southern Repertory Theatre at the Contemporary Art Center, 900 Camp Street
Included in: All-Access Pass
Price: $20-35 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): N/A

Friday
8 PM–10:00 PM
▸ Literary Late Night: The MelaNated Writers Collective Presents The Literary Jook Joint

Location: M. Francis Gallery
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $15
Ticket Code(s): JookJointFri8pm, AllAccessPass

Friday
8 PM–9:15 PM
▸ A Tennessee Williams Songbook: Only a Paper Moon

Location: Hotel Monteleone Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $38 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): SongbookFri8pm, AllAccessPass

Saturday, March 23rd
TOP | WED | THU | FRI | SAT | SUN
Saturday
8 AM–9:30 AM
▸ Breakfast Book Club

Location: Muriel’s Jackson Square Restaurant
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): BreakfastSat8am, AllAccessPass

Saturday
10 AM–12:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Literary Walking Tour

Location: Tour meets in the Hotel Monteleone Lobby, Heritage Tours
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Walking Tour
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): WalkTourSat10am, AllAccessPass

Saturday
10 AM–11:15 AM
▸ A Reading from the Poetry and Fiction Contests with Judges Michael Cunningham and Ava Leavell Haymon

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
10 AM–11:15 AM
▸ Tennessee Williams and Southern Gothic Tradition

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
10 AM–11:15 AM
▸ Keeping It Real for Young Audiences

Location: Muriel’s Jackson Square Restaurant
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
11:30 AM–12:15 PM
▸ Breaking News: A Conversation with Douglas Brinkley

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
11:30 AM–12:15 PM
▸ Telling Tennessee’s Story

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
11:30 AM–12:15 PM
▸ Diversifying Your Career: It’s No Longer a Mystery

Location: Muriel’s Jackson Square Restaurant
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
1 PM–2:15 PM
▸ Courage In Journalism

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
1 PM–2:15 PM
▸ Conversation with Don Murray, Interviewed by Foster Hirsch

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
1 PM–2:15 PM
▸ Pitchapalooza

Location: Muriel’s Jackson Square Restaurant
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
1:30 PM–2:30 PM
▸ Sipping on a New Orleans Afternoon

Location: Arnaud’s French 75 Bar, 813 Bienville
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $30 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): SippingSat130pm, AllAccessPass

Saturday
2 PM–3:30 PM
▸ The Gnädiges Fräulein

Location: Dutch Alley Performance Pavilion on St. Phillip & Decatur, near the French Market.
Included in: All-Access Pass, Theater Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): GnadigesSat2pm, AllAccessPass

Saturday
2 PM–4:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Literary Walking Tour

Location: Tour meets in the Hotel Monteleone Lobby, Heritage Tours
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Walking Tour
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): WalkTourSat2pm, AllAccessPass

Saturday
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
▸ Writing New Orleans: the Most “Exotic” Place in America

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
▸ “They Told Me to Take a Streetcar”: Revisiting a Classic

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
4 PM–5:15 PM
▸ The South: Literature of Exile, Refuge, and Return

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
4 PM–5:15 PM
▸ Make This Place Your Own: Poetry Readings

Location: Williams Research Center, 410 Chartres Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSat

Saturday
6 PM–7:15 PM
▸ There’s No Way We Can’t Finally Win

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Vieux Carre Room
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): NoWayWeSat6pm, AllAccessPass

Saturday
7:30 PM–9:30 PM
▸ “Mold” by John Biguenet

Location: Southern Repertory Theatre at the Contemporary Art Center, 900 Camp Street
Included in: All-Access Pass
Price: $20-35 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): N/A

Saturday
8 PM–9:30 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams in Others’ Words

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $35 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): OthersWorSat8pm, AllAccessPass

Saturday
8 PM–10:00 PM
▸ Literary Late Night: New Orleans Nocturnes

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Vieux Carre Room
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $20 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): NocturnesSat8pm, AllAccessPass

Sunday, March 24th
TOP | WED | THU | FRI | SAT | SUN
Sunday
10 AM–12:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Literary Walking Tour

Location: Tour meets in the Hotel Monteleone Lobby, Heritage Tours
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Walking Tour
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): WalkTourSun10am, AllAccessPass

Sunday
10 AM–11:15 AM
▸ I Remember Tennessee

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
10 AM–11:15 AM
▸ Sparkle and Polish: Creating Successful Short Fiction

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Royal Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
11 AM–12:15 PM
▸ Staged Reading of the 2013 Festival One-Act Play Contest Winner

Location: Hotel Monteleone, La Nouvelle Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
11:30 AM–12:45 PM
▸ Influences, Mentors, & Proteges: Three Contemporary American Playwrights

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
11:30 AM–12:45 PM
▸ Day of Music at the Palm Court Jazz Café — Drummer and Smoke: Discussion and Music Centered on the Book “Ernie K-Doe: the R&B Emperor of New Orleans”

Location: Palm Court Jazz Cafe, 1204 Decatur Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
11:30 AM–12:45 PM
▸ Telling the Truth, But Better: the Art of Creative Non-Fiction

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Royal Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
11:30 AM–12:45 PM
▸ At Tennessee’s Table

Location: The Pelican Club Restaurant, 312 Exchange Alley
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): TableSun1130am, AllAccessPass

Sunday
12 PM–1:15 PM
▸ “Jumpers” by Jessica Alexander

Location: Hotel Monteleone, La Nouvelle Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
1 PM – 2:15 PM
▸ A Conversation with Judith Chapman About Her One-Woman Show, Vivien

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
1 PM–2:15 PM
▸ Reading in the Digital Age

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Royal Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
1 PM–2:15 PM
▸ Day of Music at the Palm Court Jazz Café — Drummer and Smoke: Phil Melancon Performs with Wanda Rouzan and Leah Chase

Location: Palm Court Jazz Cafe, 1204 Decatur Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
1:30 PM–2:30 PM
▸ “Auto-Da-Fe” by Tennessee Williams

Location: Hermann-Grima House, 820 St. Louis Street
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): AutoDaFeSu130pm, AllAccessPass

Sunday
2 PM–3:30 PM
▸ The Gnädiges Fräulein

Location: Dutch Alley Performance Pavilion on St. Phillip & Decatur, near the French Market
Included in: All-Access Pass, Theater Ticket
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): GnadigesSun2pm, AllAccessPass

Sunday
2 PM–4:00 PM
▸ “Mold” by John Biguenet

Location: Southern Repertory Theatre at the Contemporary Art Center, 900 Camp Street
Included in: All-Access Pass
Price: $20-35 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): N/A

Sunday
2 PM–4:00 PM
▸ Tennessee Williams Literary Walking Tour

Location: Tour meets in the Hotel Monteleone Lobby, Heritage Tours
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Walking Tour
Price: $25 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): WalkTourSun2pm, AllAccessPass

Sunday
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
▸ Conversation with Michael Cunningham

Location: Hotel Monteleone Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
▸ Writing Marathon Wrap-Up with Richard Louth

Location: Hotel Monteleone, Royal Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Literary Panel Pass, Student Panel Pass, Teacher/Senior Citizen Literary Panel Pass, One Day Festival Panel Pass, Single Panel Ticket (only available on site)
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): AllAccessPass, LitPanelPass, StudentPanPass, Sr/TeachPanPass, DayPanelPassSun

Sunday
2:30 PM–3:45 PM
▸ Day of Music at the Palm Court Jazz Café — Drummer and Smoke: Paul Sanchez Plays “Nine Lives” SOLD OUT!

Location: Palm Court Jazz Cafe, 1204 Decatur Street
Included in: SOLD OUT
Price: $10 (Single Ticket Event: only available on site), or included in All-Access Pass ($500), Festival Panel Pass ($75), or Day Panel Pass ($30)
Ticket Code(s): N/A

Sunday
4:15 PM–6:00 PM
▸ Stanley and Stella Shouting Contest

Location: Jackson Square
Included in: N/A
Price: Free and open to the public.
Ticket Code(s): N/A

Sunday
7 PM–8:15 PM
▸ A Tennessee Williams Songbook: Only a Paper Moon

Location: Hotel Monteleone Queen Anne Ballroom
Included in: All-Access Pass, Individual Special Event Ticket
Price: $38 or included in All-Access Pass
Ticket Code(s): SongbookSun7pm, AllAccessPass

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This is a great write up from last week about Chef Ryan Hughes

March 12th, 2013 · No Comments

By Susan Langenhennig, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
on March 05, 2013 at 2:49 PM, updated March 05, 2013 at 4:08 PM

Purloo explores Southern foods at weekly pop-up dinners, Dishcrawl comes to New Orleans, and other dining eventsChef Ryan Hughes

Chef Ryan Hughes (Photo by Dinah Rogers, The Times-Picayune / NOLA.com)

It will be a few more months before Chef Ryan Hughes settles into his permanent kitchen at Purloo, the new restaurant set to open inside the Southern Food & Beverage Museum’s new building on Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard. In the meantime, Hughes has been hard at work building a fan base for the restaurant’s Southern-focused food.

Hughes has been holding Purloo pop-up dinners, exploring culinary traditions across the South, from Texas’ Rio Grande region to South Carolina’s lowcountry to Louisiana’s Cajun culture.

The next dinner is set for Wednesday, March 6 at 6:30 p.m. at the Creole Gardens Guesthouse and Inn, 1415 Prytania St. It will zero in on coastal Alabama, with dishes such as cornmeal-fried Alabama eastern oysters, black-eyed pea and edamame “caviar” and curried crème fraiche; apple, pickled kabocha pumpkin and endive salad; Fudge Family Farms’ grilled pork loin; sweet potato cupcakes and pecan divinity.

Seating at the dinner is limited to 50 people, and reservations fill up fast. The cost is $55 per person. Cocktails are served at 6:30 p.m. in the patio, followed by dinner at 7:30 p.m. For reservations and information, call or text 504.430.1840 or email nolapurloo@gmail.com.

With Purloo, Hughes gets to interpret Southern food with French techniques. He’s a graduate of Johnson & Wales University in Charleston, S.C., and previously worked at Johnny V’s and Café Degas restaurants.

Other upcoming themes for the Purloo dinners include Southern soul food on March 13; a literary-inspired menu on March 20 in honor of the Tennessee Williams Festival, with author readings before each course; and foods of Appalachia on March 27.

→ No CommentsTags: Uncategorized

Who’s Hungry

February 26th, 2013 · No Comments

Purloo
@ Creole Gardens Guesthouse and Inn
Wednesday February 27th
Rio Grande
Amuse – Cheddar and short rib kolaches
Texas barbequed quail, butter lettuce, blistered grape tomatoes, requeson Mexican cheese, toasted pepitas

Ahi tuna ceviche, grilled Rio Star grapefruit,
jicama and mint

Dry roasted hanger steak, jalapeno polenta,
smoked king oyster mushroom, tomato ginger jam

Cashel Blue cheese, honey glazed almonds

Malted caramel Mexican flan, fresh strawberries

Prix Fixe $55
Limited Seating
For reservations call/text 504-430-1840
or
email: nolapurloo@gmail.com

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This is a really great article about New Orleans from the New York Times today

January 27th, 2013 · No Comments

January 26, 2013
A Saint in His City: Archie Manning in New Orleans
By SAM BORDEN
NEW ORLEANS — In 1971, when Archie Manning arrived in New Orleans to quarterback the Saints, he quickly became a spokesman for a local Chevrolet dealer and was given a shiny red Corvette. With little hesitation, he began whizzing around town in his new sports car. He was 22. He was an athlete. He was giddy.

He was also, as it turned out, not particularly adept at judging distances. The problem with the Corvette was that its hood was elongated, stretching “like 10 feet out in front of the windshield,” he said.

One day, while approaching a stop sign, he slammed into the car in front of him. The man in the other car threw open his door, clearly not happy.

But then, abruptly, the man stopped. He stood, peering into the Corvette. And then he smiled. “Hey, Arch!” he called out, and then screamed, “Go Saints!” Then the man got back in his car and drove away.

Sitting on his couch this month while recalling the story, Manning laughed. “Yep,” he said. “That was pretty much the beginning.”

The beginning of Manning’s stardom, yes, but even more the beginning of a love, an affection, a relationship between a family and a city. There is, to be sure, widespread disappointment that neither Peyton nor Eli Manning will be playing in the Super Bowl next Sunday, but that does not mean there will not be a Manning quarterback drawing cheers and signing autographs and shaking hands all week.

Archie, perhaps the most famous New Orleans quarterback of all, is here. He always has been.

“He’s the first citizen of this city, that’s the only way I can say it,” James Carville, the political consultant and New Orleans resident, said in an interview. “He’s the one.”

The city’s abiding love for Archie Manning is not complicated. New Orleanians embrace him because he passed here and ran here, but also because he stayed here. He was the quarterback for the Saints from 1971 to 1982, a sharp-jawed, redheaded constant in a period of perpetual coaching changes, unstable executive structure and, most memorably, an incredible run of really, really bad football.

As the losses piled up, seemingly everyone left the organization at one point or another, except Archie. He stayed for the 2-12 team in 1975 and the 3-11 team in 1977. He saw 2-11-1 in 1972 and 1-15 in 1980. Then he saw three boys grow up. Then he saw Hurricane Katrina. Then he saw the recovery.

“He had every reason to leave,” Carville said. “He could have. But he didn’t.”

The Journey From Mississippi

Technically, the Mannings are transplants. Archie was born in the Delta, in Drew, Miss., and his wife, Olivia, is from Philadelphia, Miss., about 140 miles southeast of Drew. New Orleans is also not the only city to claim the Mannings as local royalty. In Oxford, Miss., where Archie and Eli both starred at quarterback for Mississippi, the speed limit on campus is 18 miles an hour — in honor of Archie’s jersey number — and the speed limit on Manning Way, the road around the football stadium, is 10 m.p.h. — in honor of Eli’s.

Given those connections, it is hardly surprising that Archie and Olivia initially planned to return to Mississippi. “That was always our intention,” Archie said. “It was just going to be temporary here.”

Mississippi was in their blood. The Mannings met at Ole Miss, and married during their senior year. They moved to Louisiana after Archie was selected second over all in the 1971 N.F.L. draft.

When Olivia came to New Orleans to look at houses, she did not cast a wide net. She looked in Metairie, and only Metairie, because that was the one area that she or Archie had heard anything about. “It’s where the Saints trained,” Archie said. “So that’s where we lived.”

Their first apartment — “they called it a penthouse because we had a patio,” Archie said — was memorable because it was not far from Drago’s, a restaurant where charbroiled oysters are said to have been invented. Listening from the kitchen while Archie lovingly recalled the oysters, Olivia called out, “You’re really going down memory lane now, aren’t you?” A moment later though, she added, “They were really very good.”

It did not take long for the Mannings to become attached to New Orleans. During his rookie minicamp, Archie went with several other players to the old Municipal Auditorium to see the local middleweight boxer Tony Licata. The players went out afterward, and the next morning, Saints Coach J. D. Roberts sat them down before practice. “Now listen,” Manning recalled Roberts saying gravely. “You know you’re not going to be making a habit of going down there, right?”

Generally, Archie did not. But it was difficult to ignore the allure of New Orleans, particularly because the players were generally treated well. After the Saints upset Los Angeles in Archie’s first game, a large group retired to the French Quarter for a long dinner at the Rib Room. He says he is not quite sure where they went next, but there is a good chance the famed bar Pat O’Brien’s was involved.

“It wasn’t like people ever go to bed early around here,” Archie said laughing, and it did not take long for him and Olivia to fall in love with the overflowing options for art and music and the sort of food that makes the back of your tongue tingle. Near the top of their list was the barbecue shrimp at Pascal’s Manale restaurant, and the Mannings would gladly wait the 90 minutes it often took to get in there.

“Except on Sunday night,” Archie said. “On Sunday night, after games, we got right in. On Wednesday, we waited like everyone else.”

The only thing wrong was the football. This was not altogether unfamiliar territory — Manning is one of the most celebrated college players even though Ole Miss was only 15-7 over his last two seasons — yet the Saints’ play sank to particularly pungent depths.

The Saints lost — a lot — and Archie never played on a team with a winning record. He also was hit — a lot — being sacked 340 times during his Saints career. It got so bad that fans often referred to the team as the Aints and wore bags on their heads at games. The Manning family nadir came when Olivia looked around during one particularly loud cavalcade of boos and realized that her oldest son, Cooper, then about 7 and sitting next to her, was joining the chorus.

“Yeah, I did it,” Cooper said. “I booed. Everyone else was doing it and you know, it’s a copycat league.”

He laughed and said, “I mean, 1-15 is 1-15!” Despite Archie’s being pummeled on a near-weekly basis, he and Olivia were becoming more attached to their new home. When Peyton was born in 1976, joining Cooper, who had arrived two years earlier, the Mannings discussed moving to a larger house. For a moment, they considered another place in the suburbs. Then, Olivia said to Archie, “There’s a million suburbs — there’s only one Uptown,” and the family ended up buying a charming camelback cottage on Seventh Street in the neighborhood.

There, Peyton and Cooper shared a room upstairs that had originally been the master bedroom where they wrestled, played knee-high football and even created their own version of indoor tennis that featured “some of the longest points ever,” Cooper recalled, because the ball was soft and squishy like a balloon.

The family became embedded in New Orleans. The children played in Audubon Park. Archie loved running on St. Charles Avenue. On special occasions, the family might go to Ruth’s Chris for dinner; on most Saturdays, they went for the messy po’boy sandwiches and Barq’s root beers at the famed Domilise’s.

Even when Archie was traded to Houston in 1982, he essentially commuted, flying to New Orleans — “On Southwest, it was only $29!” he said — whenever he could. Sometimes, Olivia put Cooper or Peyton on a flight to go see their father play, and Archie had Oliver Luck, the father of the current Colts quarterback Andrew Luck but then just a rookie quarterback with the Oilers, take care of them. Often, after quarterback meetings were finished, Oliver took Peyton to McDonald’s. Then after the game, Archie would put his sons on a plane back home.

It was not ideal, but the family did not want to leave New Orleans. In 1984, after Archie had been traded to the Minnesota Vikings in the middle of the previous season, the family rented a house in Minnetonka. One morning in November, they woke to find several feet of snow covering the backyard.

Olivia seemed unimpressed. She kept staring at a tiny pond that was in the back. “Where are all the ducks?” she said. “It’s cold, so I guess they flew south,” Archie answered with a shrug.

Olivia nodded. “They went south?” she said. “Well, so am I.”

That off-season, the Mannings returned to New Orleans for good.

By the time Archie retired, Eli, who was born in 1981, was 4 and the family had moved into what would become known around New Orleans as “the Manning house.” Sitting in the middle of the Garden District, it is a historic home and remains a frequent stop on tours of the area. It has high ceilings, pretty flowers in the yard, a swimming pool and a view from the backyard of another stately New Orleans house that was once home to the musician Trent Reznor and is currently occupied by the actor John Goodman.

When the three Manning boys were young, though, their home was mostly a place for sports. Most memorably for the boys, there was a game they called ’Mazing Catches — “No ‘a,’ ” Cooper said — which involved Archie standing on the porch and firing passes that were just out in front of the boys as they ran across the lawn. “If it was a little wet and you could dive and slide, that was the big play,” Eli said. “We were probably a little spoiled having a professional quarterback throwing to us.”

Even though Archie was no longer playing, his popularity did not wane. He had moved into broadcasting, working as a game analyst on the Saints’ radio network and serving as a spokesman for several companies. Eli said he did not remember a time when his father did not have people coming up to him asking for autographs.

“As a kid, it was just something that happened,” Eli said. “That was just what my dad did. It was normal, like — O.K., so, should I go up and ask my friends’ dads for their autographs, too?”

When it came to sports, Archie’s general philosophy was to avoid being overbearing, and so he rarely coached his sons’ teams and, if he did, it was usually as an assistant. There was one time, though, when he was a head coach because there were not enough other fathers who volunteered.

“It was basketball, and Peyton was little,” Archie said, shaking his head. “There was a draft; there were tryouts for all the kids and then the coaches put the teams together. But I couldn’t go to the tryout, so at the draft, I just drafted all my friends’ kids because I thought that would be nice for everyone to play together.”

Archie sighed.

“Well, we were terrible,” he said. “We were very bad. And Peyton got really mad at me. ‘Why did you draft these guys? What’s wrong with you?’ He was really competitive. And so that’s when I quit being a head coach.”

A Proud Host

Archie smiled as he reminisced about his sons growing up in New Orleans. The boys embraced the city, too, he said: Eli, the baby of the family, was known to sometimes go antiquing with his mother and as they got older, all three began stopping in at Domilise’s for po’boys on their own. Sometimes, Eli would even work a little for Miss Dot, the woman who ran the place. Even now, decades later, Peyton was mortified when Cooper texted him this season to inform him that there were no photographs on the wall of Peyton in a Denver Broncos uniform. “They’re in the mail right now,” he texted back almost immediately.

“I think we all saw how much the city meant to our parents,” Eli said. “And there is no doubt that it translated to us. New Orleans is a part of us.”

The family has spread over the years. Peyton went to Tennessee for college, then lived in Indianapolis and now Denver. Eli lives in New Jersey and keeps a place in Oxford for downtime during the off-season. After Hurricane Katrina, however, they immediately returned to New Orleans, teaming with the Red Cross to bring food and clothes and supplies to those affected by the storm.

Their family house, where Archie and Olivia still live, escaped with only minor damage, though Cooper, who works as an energy trader, did have to deal with more significant repairs to his family’s home.

In the years since the storm, Archie said, he and Olivia never considered leaving. “How could we?” he said, and he has reveled in seeing his grandchildren play on the same lawn where his sons did. Each summer, he and the boys run the Manning Passing Academy for aspiring quarterbacks and he has watched with pride as his adopted city has risen again. This week, as the city is overrun with football, Archie says he expects to be busy making appearances and signing autographs, and checking in on the way things are going at Manning’s, the restaurant he owns downtown.

Carville even joked that if N.F.L. Commissioner Roger Goodell is looking for someone to protect him from all the angry Saints fans still furious over the discipline he imposed after the bounty scandal, all Goodell needs to do is walk around town with Archie.

“That’s one way to stay safe,” Carville said, laughing. “Personal bodyguard, guaranteed.”

Archie, of course, would be happy to do it. “We need to be good hosts,” he said earnestly, before rattling off the previous nine Super Bowls that have been played in New Orleans. He concluded, “The city is perfect for games like this.”

Then he leaned back on the couch and began listing what he loves about New Orleans. The World War II museum. The energy. The food. The people. On and on he went.

“It’s home,” he said finally, and he smiled. No, a Manning quarterback is not playing in the Super Bowl next Sunday, but that does not mean one is not here. The most famous Manning quarterback in New Orleans has always been the one who never left.

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2013 Parade Schedule!!

January 22nd, 2013 · No Comments

Saturday, January 19, 2013

Krewe du Vieux (Mature themed) 6:30 p.m. French Quarter

Sunday, January 20, 2013

Little Rascals Noon Metairie

Friday, January 25, 2013

Oshun 6:00 p.m. Uptown
Cleopatra 6:30 p.m. Uptown

Saturday, January 26, 2013

Adonis 11:45 a.m. Westbank
Pontchartrain 1:00 p.m. Uptown
Choctaw Follows Pontchartrain Uptown
Sparta 6:00 p.m. Uptown
Pygmallion 6:45 p.m. Uptown

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Carrollton Noon Uptown
Perseus 1:00 p.m. Slidell
King Arthur 1:15 p.m. Uptown
Dionysus 2:00 p.m. Slidell
Thor 2:00 p.m. Metairie

Friday, February 1, 2013

Eve 7:00 p.m. Mandeville
Excalibur 7:00 p.m. Metairie
Atlas 7:30 p.m. Metairie

Saturday, February 2, 2013

Alla Noon Westbank
Nemesis 1:00 p.m. St. Bernard
Caesar 6:00 p.m. Metairie
Olympia 6:00 p.m. Covington
Titans 6:30 p.m. Slidell

Sunday, February 3, 2013

Super Bowl XLVII

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

Druids 6:30 p.m. Uptown
Nyx 7:00 p.m. Uptown

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Knights of Babylon 5:45 p.m. Uptown
Chaos 6:30 p.m. Uptown
Muses 6:30 p.m. Uptown

Friday, February 8, 2013

Hermes 6:00 p.m. Uptown
Le Krewe D’etat 6:30 p.m. Uptown
Selene 6:30 p.m. Slidell
Orpheus 7:00 p.m. Mandeville
Lyra 7:00 p.m. Mandeville
Morpheus 7:00 p.m. Uptown
Centurions 7:00 p.m. Metairie

Saturday, February 9, 2013

NOMTOC 10:45 a.m. Westbank
Iris 11:00 a.m. Uptown
Tucks Noon Uptown
Endymion 4:15 p.m. Uptown
Isis 6:30 p.m. Metairie

Sunday, February 10, 2013

Okeanos 11:00 a.m. Uptown
Mid-City 11:45 p.m. Uptown
Thoth Noon Uptown
Bacchus 5:15 p.m. Uptown
Napoleon 5:30 p.m. Metairie

Monday, February 11, 2013

Proteus 5:15 p.m. Uptown
Orpheus 6:00 p.m. Uptown
Hera 6:30 p.m. Metairie
Zeus 7:00 p.m. Metairie

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Zulu 8:00 a.m. Uptown
Rex 10:00 a.m. Uptown
Elks Orleanians (Truck Parade) Follows Rex Uptown
Cresent City (Truck Parade) Follows Elks Orleanians Uptown
Grela 10:00 a.m. Gretna
Argus 10:00 a.m. Metairie
Krewe of Jefferson (Truck Parade) Follows Argus Metairie
Elks Jeffersonians (Truck Parade) Follows Krewe of Jefferson Metairie

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Jazz Fest Lineups Announced!

January 17th, 2013 · No Comments

The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival’s 2013 lineup is here: Frank Ocean, Phoenix, The Black Keys, Fleetwood Mac, Dave Matthews Band, Billy Joel, Widespread Panic, Hall & Oates, John Mayer, and Patti Smith will all take the stage over the festival’s two weekends (April 26-28 and May 2-5).

Other notables include Gary Clark Jr., Band of Horses, Andrew Bird, MuteMath, Jimmy Cliff, B.B. King, Willie Nelson, Jill Scott, Dr. John, Ben Harper and Charlie Musslewhite, Earth, Wind & Fire, Maroon 5, Los Lobos, The Preservation Hall Jazz Band, The Nevilles, Galactic, Charles Bradley, Calexico, Pokey LaFarge, The Del McCoury Band, Campbell Brothers, Jerry Douglas, Sonny Landreth, and George Porter, Jr. Click here to see the day-by-day breakdown.

Various ticketing packages are now available through the festival’s website.

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It’s Time To Start Getting Ready Y’all! Jazz Fest Talent Announcement January 17!!!!

January 8th, 2013 · No Comments

JAZZ FEST TICKET INFORMATION

New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival Tickets

1st Weekend Single Day Tickets (April 26, 27 & 28)
Advance adult ticket: $45 (for a limited time only)
Advance adult ticket: $50 (starting mid to late January, exact date to be announced)
Gate Price: $65
(each ticket valid for any single day of the weekend)
Child’s ticket: $5 (available at the gate only, ages 2 – 10, adult must be present with child)
Click here to purchase online.

2nd Weekend Single Day Tickets (May 2, 3, 4 & 5)
Advance adult ticket: $45 (for a limited time only)
Advance adult ticket: $50 (starting mid to late January, exact date to be announced)
Gate Price: $65
(each ticket valid for any single day of the weekend)
Child’s ticket: $5 (available at the gate only, ages 2 – 10, adult must be present with child)
Click here to purchase online.

Big Chief VIP Experience

The Big Chief VIP Experience is the most luxurious way to enjoy the 2013 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival. A limited number of tickets are sold (first come, first served). The Big Chief VIP Experience often sells out—patrons are encouraged to purchase early to avoid being shut out. Premium ticket package includes Festival admission with re-entry privileges; access to special viewing areas at major Festival stages and in some tents; access to a VIP Hospitality lounge; special access to restrooms and beverage concessions; parking, if desired; and more.

Find out more about this exciting way to experience Jazz Fest here.

Grand Marshal VIP Pass

The Grand Marshal VIP Pass is designed for the Festivalgoer who wants the luxury of moving from stage to stage, combined with the thrill of seeing Jazz Fest’s world-class performers up close.

A very limited number of Jazz Fest fans can upgrade their Festival experience to a pass that allows exclusive access to an upfront, golden circle viewing environment at the Festival’s three main stages: The Acura Stage, The Gentilly Stage, and The Congo Square Stage.

The Grand Marshal VIP Pass is sold by specific weekend and includes re-entry privileges (pedestrian only). A very limited number of Grand Marshal packages that include reserved parking are available for purchase.

Find out more about this exciting way to experience Jazz Fest here.

Krewe Of Jazz Fest VIP Pass

Jazz Fest attendees have the opportunity to view all the action at the Acura Stage in an exclusive environment. The Krewe of Jazz Fest area features covered high-end folding seats along with private upscale restroom facilities and a dedicated beverage concession area.

As the number of Krewe of Jazz Fest VIP Passes sold is limited, interested patrons are encouraged to purchase their Passes early to avoid being shut out.

The Krewe of Jazz Fest Pass is sold by specific weekend and includes re-entry privileges (pedestrian only). A very limited number of Krewe of Jazz Fest packages that include reserved parking are available for purchase.

Find out more about this exciting way to experience Jazz Fest here.

FOUR CONVENIENT WAYS TO PURCHASE TICKETS

Purchase Tickets Online Through Ticketmaster.com
American Express, Visa, MC, Discover
ticketmaster.com

Ticketmaster Charge By Phone
American Express, Visa, MC, Discover
(800) 745-3000

Ticketmaster Outlets
Cash, American Express, Visa, MC, Discover
Ticketmaster Retail Outlets

New Orleans Arena
Cash, Visa, MasterCard, & American Express
Tickets can be purchased in person at the Jazz Fest ticket office located at the New Orleans Arena. The New Orleans Arena Box Office is located at 1501 Girod St. A $5 per ticket service charge will apply to cash purchases and additional service charges on credit card transactions.
PLEASE NOTE

* Absolutely no refunds or exchanges on tickets.
* Scanning Notice: All tickets to Jazz Fest will be electronically scanned.
* Tickets obtained from unauthorized sources could be lost, stolen, or counterfeit and, if so, are void.
* Photo ID required for all will call.

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Come support your furry friends at our annual fundraiser!

January 7th, 2013 · No Comments

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We couldn’t wait until 12th night. Woohoo!! It’s carnival time!!

January 4th, 2013 · No Comments

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Sugar Bowl Tonight!

January 2nd, 2013 · No Comments

We here at Creole Gardens are happy to welcome all of our guests that are here for the Sugarbowl! Who do you think will win? Here is a great article about the Louisville/Florida matchup.

 

Sugar Bowl 2013: Breaking Down Florida vs. Louisville

BY 

(FEATURED COLUMNIST) ON JANUARY 2, 2013

484 reads

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Hi-res-156751614_crop_exactSam Greenwood/Getty Images

When the No. 21 Louisville Cardinals square off against the vaunted No. 3 Florida Gators Wednesday night in the 2013 Allstate Sugar Bowl, the excitement over what could be the most intriguing matchup of bowl season is through the roof.

With Florida’s offensive inabilities and the question marks surrounding just how well Louisville will play a team as talented as the Gators, this matchup is too interesting to ignore.

There are no other college football games on Wednesday night, and with a limited television selection this week, every fan of the sport—from casual to hardcore—must be tuning into this amazing matchup.

 

When: Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 8:30 p.m. ET

Where: Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans, La.

Watch: ESPN

Live Stream: ESPN3

Listen: ESPN Radio

 

 

Hi-res-157183532_crop_exactRich Schultz/Getty Images

 

Sugar Bowl Breakdown

While there is no doubting just how talented the Louisville Cardinals have been this season, there are serious questions about how they will hold up against the Florida Gators’ tough defensive unit.

Florida plays a brutal SEC-style defense that the Cardinals haven’t seen in the Big East, and Louisville must have a way to answer the Gators’ defensive riddles early and often if they want a chance to win.

 

Who ya got?

Submit Vote vote to see results

 

It won’t be easy, though, as Florida’s tough defensive unit is ranked third in the nation allowing just 12.9 points per game. While the Cardinals are putting up an average of 31 points per game, those statistics came against the competition in the Big East.

The SEC is the flat-out tougher football conference, hands down.

Despite Florida’s clear competition advantage, Louisville is lucky to be facing the Gators instead of another SEC team that boasts an offense that can sufficiently complement its elite defensive unit.

While Florida has a solid rushing attack (ranked 34th in the nation), the team’s putrid passing attack (118th in the sport with just 143.9 yards per game) will leave the door open for a talented Cardinals team to take advantage if they can beat the Gators’ tough defense.

In the end, it will be Florida’s vaunted SEC defense that steps up huge and gives the team’s porous offense a chance to steal the victory.

Prediction: Florida 17, Louisville 13

 

 

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Welcome back, Coach!

December 29th, 2012 · No Comments

New Orleans Saints,

Sean Payton can now

truly start fresh

together in 2013

breespay.jpg
New that Sean Payton and Drew Brees are going to be reunited in 2013 the New Orleans Saints should go back to being a playoff contender. (Photo by Ted Jackson, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune)
Mike Triplett, NOLA.com | The Times-PicayuneBy Mike Triplett, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune
on December 28, 2012 at 7:54 PM, updated December 28, 2012 at 8:29 PM
Email

 

Two huge thumbs up to Sean Payton, Mickey Loomis, Tom Benson, agent Don Yee and anyone else involved with getting a new contract extension done before the end of the 2012 season – even if they waited until the final weekend. Thanks to them, the New Orleans Saints can now truly turn the page when the calendar shifts to 2013.

As I wrote just a few hours ago, it was understandable why both sides had stayed patient throughout their contract talks up until now. But there were going to be some harmful repercussions starting Monday.

Now, there’s nothing to worry about. And now it feels like there never was.

Even if it is just symbolic, there’s got to be something cathartic about the Saints starting off their 2013 season with optimism and excitement instead of lingering doubts and uncertainty.

They had enough of that this year.

Offensive tackle Zach Strief certainly feels that way, based on his strong reaction to the news Friday night:

“I think things are starting to go for us rather than against us,” Strief said, adding that he thinks the news gives Sunday’s regular-season finale against the Carolina Panthers even more importance. ”I think that we are playing our best football at the end of the year, and that is what Coach Payton would expect and demand from us. We want to finish this season the right way and give ourselves some momentum. Coach re-signing is like getting a big shove at the top of the hill.

“We just spent the last 12 weeks trying to climb it, and now we can start rolling. It really excites me for next year. Coach Payton is the reason this organization has turned around, and we can’t wait to get him back in the building where he belongs.”

Make no mistake, Payton’s job won’t be easy when he gets back to work. The Saints’ arrow isn’t pointed in the same direction right now as it was when he left. And now they’re going to lose more veteran players because of salary-cap constraints, and they won’t be able to afford any kind of defensive overhaul.

But I truly do believe they’ll be serious playoff contenders again in 2013, especially with Payton back. The Saints underachieved in 2012. Their offense is better than this. And their defense has shown vast improvement to at least offer hope of being a middle-of-the-road unit next year.

Add in the fact that everyone from Payton on down will be champing at the bit to get back on the field next season, and you’ve got that deadly combination that has worked well in the past – talent plus hunger.

Has a team ever been more excited about the start of a new year?

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The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of New Orleans Net LLC.

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Things To Do In The City This Evening!

December 20th, 2012 · No Comments

Celebration in the Oaks puts on the final concert in its 2012 series, Tales of the Toddy takes over the Hyatt Regency, the New Orleans Craft Mafia hosts its last stop shop, ArtSpot Productions celebrates Kathy Randels’ new CD at Cafe Istanbul, and the Alvar Library hosts a holiday potluck and dance party. Find full listings in ourevents calendar.

CONCERT IN THE OAKS

The third and final edition of the Celebration in the Oaks 2012 Concert Series is tonight (Dec. 20) at 7 p.m. on the Robert B. Haspel Outdoor Stage, One Palm Dr. John Rankin, Don Vappie and Cindy Scott perform. Tours of Celebration in the Oaks cost $7.00, and the concert is no additional charge.

TALES OF THE TODDY

The annual ode to winter cocktails, Tales of the Toddy, is at the Hyatt Regency, 601 Loyola Ave., tonight (Dec. 20) from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Bartenders, mixologists, restaurants and vendors will create custom cocktails and guests will vote on their favorite. The event is sold out, but N.O. Drinks writer Todd A. Price rounded up a variety of available toddies and warm cocktails around town.

LAST STOP SHOP AT THE BIG TOP

The New Orleans Craft Media hosts its 7th annual Last Stop at the Big Top, 1638 Clio St., from 5 to 9 tonight (Dec. 20). The organizers create a party atmosphere with giveaways, soap-making, snacks and a cash bar.

KATHY RANDELS CD RELEASE

The extended ArtSpot Productions family hosts a CD release party for Kathy Randels’ ‘I Know This to Be True’ at the Café Istanbul Performance Theater inside the New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Avenue, tonight (Dec. 20) at 5 p.m. See Keith Spera’s preview of the free event.

ALVAR ARTS HOLIDAY PARTY

Alvar Library, 913 Alvar St., hosts a holiday potluck with music by the Honeypots Trio tonight (Dec. 20) from 7 to 9 p.m. The Honeypots are a songwriting trio who will perform music from their recent CD, ‘Something Sweet,’ as well as holiday favorites. There will be some snacks provided, and guests are invited to bring something to share for a festive party atmosphere.

 

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Our art is featured in a write up on New Orleans.com!

December 14th, 2012 · No Comments

Check us out in this article on NewOrleans.com about art in hotels around the city!

http://www.neworleans.com/blog/2012/12/new-orleans-hotel-art-collections/

Creole Gardens Bed & Breakfast Hotel (1415 Prytania St., (866) 569-8700)

When exploring the grounds of the Creole Gardens Bed & Breakfast, it becomes evident that this is a hotel that embraces guests with true New Orleans relaxed spirit. The hotel hosts an array of individually themed suites, ranging from soothing Caribbean cottages to the Storyville themed bordello rooms. The artwork found throughout the hotel consequently reflects this fresh, eclectic attitude. Portraits of local personalities, mixed media pieces, vintage festival posters, and quirky clocks span the walls. The majority of works come from local artists, such as Manfred Pollard. Resembling Goya’s Los Caprichos series of satirical etchings, Pollard’s whimsical black and white drawings are exhibited in the main mansion’s dining room. In addition, Creole Gardens celebrates the city’s musical pulse by displaying archival prints of photographs by Charlie Steiner. Steiner was known for documenting rock legends of the 1960’s, and his depictions of Little Richard and Janis Joplin smile at guests as they embark on their next New Orleans adventure.

Click here to check rates and book a room in the Creole Gardens Bed & Breakfast.

 

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This Friday! 12/14/2012!

December 12th, 2012 · No Comments

Come make your mark at the grand opening of Chalk, the newest interactive bar/venue in the lower garden district!

Featuring:
Musical performances by the Sweet Street Symphony !(https://www.facebook.com/sweetstreetsymphony?fref=ts)

Professional Circus artists, aerialists, and acrobats!
and all-inclusive gourmet catering by the Purple Truck

You and your friends will be able to literally write on the chalkboard-painted walls, creating an interactive, artistic space which is shaped by each and every one of you!

$10 at the door, amazing food is included!

http://www.facebook.com/events/224854084314659/

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December 10th, 2012 · No Comments

Christmas is in full swing in New Orleans!

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Visitors from St. Martin Parish

February 12th, 2012 · No Comments

Everyone here at Creole Gardens would like to thank Larry and Cindy Lieux for staying with us this weekend. Larry and Cindy won a stay with us from the trail ride raffle put on for the St. Martin Parish animal shelter. Two of our dogs, Player and Sam, came from St. Martin Parish animal shelter and we are happy to give them our support!

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There ain’t never no music playin at the Creole Gardens!

June 29th, 2011 · 1 Comment

Welcome to the new and improved Creole Blog.  More to come, soon!

The Krewe at the Creole.

 

There never aint no music playin at the Creole.

 

 

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